Ideas about Identity on TEDx

2012 Photos from Julie's iPhone 684      Hi there,

TEDxConstitutionDrive 2012 had a very interesting series of 15 minute talks on Identity in today’s world and into the future. These are important ideas to consider in the early decades of the digital revolution.

For VCE students here in Victoria, Australia, listening carefully to these talks and pondering the ideas presented will offer material relevant to any of the Contexts as well as preparing for citizenship in our rapidly changing world.

John Murray presents some of SRI’s interesting research projects which shine light on identity generally and  in the digital world in “The Future of Identity: New Research Ideas at SRI”:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qteteaPieB0

Duleesha Koolasooriya offers his thoughts about “Identity as a Barrier” in a shifting world. Check out the cheeky message on his T-shirt. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba6qtH7YWDk                                                                                                                                             

“The Need for Limited Liability Personas” is an informative and challenging talk by Canadian Kaliya Hamlin alias Kaliya Identity Woman. Anyone who has used personas or handles or pseudonyms online should listen to this. Probably be anyone reading this blog 😉    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lazg31TN8FE

In “Tribal & Scientific Identities”, Chuck Striplen & Laura Peticolas present the development of projects to amalgamate the knowledge of land management from two different paradigms and how the process challenges the identity of those involved and the efficiency model of scientific communities and corporations.  The final message is worth noting. It would be a great process to implement here in Australia with our First Nation peoples. Our Western management model imposed on a tough yet fragile landscape has created some inspiring engineering projects with profound social enrichment through the migrant workers involved but also some enormous environmental problems and terrible alienation of the original custodians of the land.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuUGgVxL2Mo

I clicked on a talk on “Identity Crisis” with a picture of a young muslim woman. It is from TEDxYouth@Cairo and, as I discovered, is in Arabic. Taken in by Menna El Kiey’s passion and energy, rather than just click away, I continued watching and listening for 5 minutes.  I enjoyed hearing the music of a language the semantics of which eluded me.  I also discovered in that time that she seamlessly wove in quite a few English words and phrases. I thought it interesting to note which ones: as long as; radio; comic; biology; trust – mistrust; communication; rules; forbid (?); guys (as an appealing address); emotion; opposite gender; dream (in the visual); achievement; TEDx; research; notes; time. This stirred many thoughts about language, culture, history and identity. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foNZoo7OgUY

I’d love to hear what you make of any or all of these explorations of identity.

Cheers,

J

 

Advertisements

NOTES ON CREATIVE WRITING: STARTING OUT WITH THE IMAGINATIVE MODE

Students of VCE English may have to write a piece in the imaginative mode for the Context study. It is most probable that the form of creative writing will require writing good prose (unless poetry is chosen).

What is good prose?

Good prose is writing which compels the reader to read on.

It generates mind pictures, atmosphere and mood.  It establishes characters and it arouses curiosity about them and their circumstances, relationships and motivations. It constructs captivating dilemmas, responses and consequences. It elicits emotional responses. It stimulates thought. It satisfies the aesthetic sense through form, language and storytelling. It feeds the ethical and philosophical sense: it can prick the conscience or offer a mirror to reflect on one’s humanity and the condition of Mankind.

How does an author or writer develop satisfying pieces of writing?

  • Authority, authenticity and finding the heart of the story
  • Imagery, sensory detail and providing a fresh ‘vision’
  • Conciseness, flair and making every word matter
  • Rhythm, euphony and creating  pitch, pace and pause
  • Poise, elegance and shaping a unique narrative

What can you do to find inspiration and develop writing skills

Just do it!

Other things you can practise:

  • Observation of people and surroundings.Image
  • Listening closely to the stories people tell each other.
  • Awareness of all the senses and how they inform our perception of the world
  • Exercise curiosity about what you hear, see and read. Ask yourself questions like: Why might this have happened? What is likely to happen as a consequence? What other possible explanations are there? Who else may have been affected or involved? What may have motivated certain actions? What would the situation have been like? How might the people involved have felt? How would I feel? What would I have done? Etc.
  • Recording your observations as above and your memories of experiences or stories — carry a notebook and pen or use digital notepad.
  • Reading widely and closely — explore a range of text types.
  • Writing a little every day — set aside 5-10 minutes to do writing exercises.
  • Researching specifics of subject matter, place, era, objects etc.
  • Having the courage to step out of your comfort zone and give it a go.
  • Having the persistence to keep at it, to chip away at it, to craft it.                                                    Just do it!

Introducing The Conversation

For all my Australian readers, especially my students; and of course any interested international readers, I would like to introduce a supplement to the Australian daily news cycle and an antidote, perhaps, to the media hype: I present you The Conversation.

https://theconversation.edu.au

Pics from Samsung 196         Who or What is The Conversation?

(from The Conversation website)

” The Conversation is an independent source of analysis, commentary and news from the university and research sector — written by acknowledged experts and delivered directly to the public. Our team of professional editors work with more than 4,500 registered academics and researchers to make this wealth of knowledge and expertise accessible to all.

We aim to be a site you can trust. All published work will carry attribution of the authors’ expertise and, where appropriate, will disclose any potential conflicts of interest, and sources of funding. Where errors or misrepresentations occur, we will correct these promptly.

Sincere thanks go to our Founding Partners who gave initial funding support: CSIROMonash UniversityUniversity of MelbourneUniversity of Technology Sydney and University of Western Australia.

Our initial content partners include those institutions, Strategic PartnerRMIT University and a growing list of member institutions. More than 180 institutions contribute content, including Australia’s research-intensive, Group of Eight universities.

We are based in Melbourne, Australia, and wholly owned by The Conversation Media Trust, a   not-for-profit company. ”

I commend it to you.

Julie

A Short Talk on Antisocial Phone Tricks

Today I found this short 3 1/2 minute speech, ‘Antisocial Phone Tricks’, by Renny Gleeson on TED.com from 2009.

From the title, what do you anticipate hearing?

Before you click the link, I will give a language alert. The speech is clear but there is one image containing a word which may offend. I apologise for this; However, I consider the message to be very important.

OK, now the teacher in me steps forward, without apology.

Below are some questions to exercise your critical thinking skills:

Were you surprised by what he spoke about or was this what you expected?

What did you think of his speaking style? Did he speak clearly and with variation in delivery? Were the graphics always matched to his spoken word for clarity and impact? Were there too few, the right balance or too many? Why do you think so?

What is the main point of his speech? What key ideas did he raise?

Did Gleeson use new vocabulary to you or use known words in different and surprising ways? How did this add to or detract from your listening experience?

How did he use humour to challenge attitudes? Did it work for you? Why or why not?

When do you think he made his intended purpose clear to you?

Is this a wake up call in 2013? Is it any less or more relevant today?

Do you agree with Renny Gleeson’s parting request? Would you view or word it differently?

For those of you studying the VCE Context Exploring Identity and Belonging, there are a couple of interesting images towards the end of the speech. Try a screen capture of them and place a copy in your folio of materials to consider. In fact those studying any of the other three Year 12 Contexts – Encountering Conflict, Imaginative Landscape, Whose Reality? – or Year 11 Contexts  – Eg. Technology and Society, Future Worlds, Migrant Experience & Growing Up – are sure to find material in this talk and presentation of interest.

Wishing you happy and satisfying thinking,

Julie

Link

Firewalls of the Mind and Hypertextuality

HYPERTEXTUALITY

This link is to beedieu‘s (Barbara Dieu) fascinating photograph of graffiti on The Berlin Wall before it was brought down. Is it really on the wall or is it a digitally manipulated image? See this post by Barbara Dieu:  http://beewebhead.blogspot.com.au/2005/03/firewalls-of-mind.html

The ‘graffiti’ reads: “BLOG AND BRING DOWN THE FIREWALLS OF THE MIND”. Dieu references the phrase “firewalls of the mind” within it. Comments follow in which someone asks if Vance Stevens knew his phrase had been used. He replies that he did and gives a reference link to an article referencing both his first use of the phrase in a publication and Barbara Dieu’s photograph in an exploration of the benefits and barriers to using ICT in teaching practice:                                                   http://advanceducation.blogspot.com.au/2011/03/transforming-learning-with-creative.html

This describes a wonderful example of hypertextuality. Moreover, my description of the hypertextuality demonstrated in these posts has links inserted within it which are also a demonstration of hypertextuality.

CONTEXTS & ISSUES

Furthermore, the photograph and related blogs raise issues about:

1. the credibility of the photographic visual image in the digital era and the implications of this;

2. the context of The Berlin Wall and what leads people and societies to build such walls then, decades later, break them down again;

3. the value of graffiti as valid social critique and commentary or art (or the harm in its anti-social sentiments and anarchistic aesthetic);

4. the effectiveness and desirability of blogging and other internet based social intercourse in changing how people think about things, educational processes and society generally.

Keep your eyes open and your mind sharp.